How to survive a Wine Tour.

It’s that time of the year again, when the words detox and dry January are popping up more than champagne corks. It’s also when people plan travel for the year ahead and, judging by my inbox, wine tours are on a lot of to-do lists for 2018.

I have already offered advice on how to organise your wine visit to Bordeaux but, given the current concern for our health, it seems appropriate to include a few tips on how our livers and waistlines can survive a week of wine tastings and wine dinners.

The ideas below are taken from my book, The Drinking Woman’s Diet – A liver- friendly lifestyle guide, to be published next month. It is based on my bitter-sweet experience of living and working in the wine and food industry in France for over 20 years.

– Eat breakfast. You might not feel like it after a big wine dinner the night before but a full stomach will slow down the absorption of alcohol into the blood stream: take the eggs and have some yoghurt for those probiotics.

Breakfast – an important start to the wine tour day

– Drink a glass of water before each tasting and before eating. I always keep a stock of bottles with me when touring. Match a glass of wine with a glass of water.

Keep the water to hand

– If your hotel is amongst the vines start the day with a walk through the vines. If you’re staying in Bordeaux, walk along the banks of the Garonne, enjoy some fresh air and work up an appetite for breakfast – see above.

– Take your supplements. Alcohol can be as challenging for your gut flora as for your liver so take some probiotics alongside your milk thistle this may help. Another supplement is Glutathione, known by wine makers for preserving the freshness of white wines – it appears to help preserve the liver too. The science is out as to whether the body can process Glutathione directly; the theory is the body can break down Milk Thistle into Glutathione. I take both if it’s a busy week – better safe than sorry.

– Don’t wear white, you’ll be spitting and red wine stains. Even experienced wine tasters don’t always have great aim. Don’t be shy about it. It’s not considered rude to the wine maker if you don’t drain each glass. They’ll be spitting.

Barrel samples can stain

– And on the subject of stains, teeth can take a pounding, especially when tasting barrel samples. Many people swear by bicarbonate of soda mixed in with toothpaste. Oil pulling with coconut oil or sesame oil is an ancient Ayurveda practise to keep the mouth and gums healthy – takes a bit of getting used to but I find it helps with tannin build-up on my teeth. A glass of champagne at the end of the day is also very effective and much more delicious.

I find a glass of champagne at the end of the day works wonders

– Don’t eat the bread. Trickier than it sounds when you sit down to lunch, starving after a morning of tasting, It may seems impossible to resist the basket of delicious fresh French bread the waiter has just put on the table – but resist you must, if not you’ll never make it through lunch or be too full for the delicious dessert.

I don’t always follow my own advice!

– Clients often comment on the lack of vegetables on offer in French restaurants. The French do eat lots of vegetables. At home a French family meal will start with either salad (crudités) in the summer or soup in the winter. Vegetables will be served with the main course and salad offered with cheese, served before dessert.

Of course the French eat vegetables

Touring the farmers markets will show you the fresh and seasonal variety on offer. So why don’t we see them on more menus? Restaurants showcase ‘noble’ products such as foie-gras, dismissing veggies as homely, sometimes offering only one vegetable as an accompaniment; and it’s often potatoes (there’s a reason they’re known as French fries).

I always try to include ‘greens’ in pre organised menus but if there is no veg proposed with your chosen dish at a restaurant, ask for the potatoes to changed to the vegetable of the day, or some salad, they are usually happy to oblige.

I’ll have salad with that please

– Take a nap on the bus on the way home, I make it a rule not talk over the speaker system after the last tasting of the afternoon. I’ll wake you when we get there.

– Choose a healthy wine tour – yes really. In May I’m teaming up with yoga teacher Martine Bounet for a wine and yoga weekend. I’m always happy for guests to join me for a few morning sun salutations before the day’s tour starts.

Wine and Yoga atf Château Lamothe Bergeron

If all else fails and you haven’t been able to resist the bread and the fries, allow a couple of extra days at the end of your tour and book yourself into detox at the Source de Caudalie Wine spa. Just don’t say I didn’t warn you.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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